Selected Customers

Specials run until 10/20/2018

Offers are for commercial and industrial customers only.
All prices are net.

Complete Price Sheet.

Not sure which edition is the right one? Visit our Edition Comparison

Update to Version 4

Sisulizer version 4 is a paid update recommended for all Sisulizer customers.

Update to Sisulizer 4

Still using Sisulizer 3 or Sisulizer 1.x/2008/2010?

Time to update to version 4 now and profit from all new features in version 4.

Software Localization News

Version 4 Build 373 released

9/9/2018

The new build comes with many new features. [...]

.NET Support updated

6/14/2018

New in May 2018: [...]

Sisulizer 4 Build 366

3/1/2017

Build 366 - support for Visual Studio 2017 [...]

10 Years Sisulizer

8/5/2016

Celebrate and save Big. [...]

Delphi Berlin, Android, Project Merge...

5/6/2016

Build 360 [...]

Our customers use Sisulizer...

to reach international customers with software in their language

to localize their in-house software in the international subsidiaries

to build multilingual custom software for their clients' enterprises

as Localization Service Providers because it is the localization tool of their customers

to localize software at Government Agencies

To teach software localization at Universities

for software localization on Electronic Devices

To translate software for Biomedical Hardware

to localize software in the Mining Industry

to create multilingual software for Mechanical Engineering

 

Output Files

When you perform the build process Sisulizer creates localized files or localized data. Localized files are the localized versions of your original files. The location and format of the localized files depends on the original file. Each platform uses its own localized data. In some cases the localized files equals to the original expect strings are translated into the target language. In that case the file format and extension is the same. Only the location is different.

For an example lets look at Windows application create by Visual C++. The original file might have C:\Files\MyApp.exe. When Sisulizer creates German application it creates German sub directory (de) and creates the German application into that directory. The result file will be C:\Files\de\MyApp.exe. To run your application in German start the German application instead of the original one.

.NET uses uses satellite assembly files for localization. Each satellite assembly file contains resources of the original assembly (e.g. application) but no code. For example if we have C:\Files\NetSample.exe application Sisulizer creates German satellite assembly file C:\Files\de\NetSample.resources.dll. Note that files extension is .dll and the file contains only resource data. You have to deploy both original assembly files and satellite assembly files of your language(s).

Specifying the output directory and file

By default Sisulizer creates the output files into the default locations. If your platform requires a specific location then Sisulizer uses it. For example .NET resource files must have filename-language.resx and .NET satellite assembly files must have language\filename.resources.dll. If your platform does not have a specific location (e.g. Visual C++) then Sisulizer uses default Sisulizer convention that creates language specific sub directories into the directory where the original file is located and creates output files into sub directories. You can change both the output directory and the output file name by using the File sheet of the source dialog. Right click the original file in the left side project three and choose Properties. Choose File sheet. The sheet contains the original file, output directory and output files.

Output directory specifies the root directory where the output file is created. By default output directory is the directory of your original file. You can change this by typing a new directory or by clicking ... and browsing a new directory.

Output files lets you specify the format and name of the output files. Some platforms support several different output formats. For example when you localize Delphi application the default output file is localized EXE but you can make Sisulizer to create also resource DLLs and/or multilingual EXE. Check the check box of output files that you want to create. Each output file types contains a combo box that is used to specify the name of the output file. You can select a pattern from the combo box list or you can type your own pattern. Each pattern contains file and language parameters.

File parameters are:

Parameter Description
<parent>

Variable is replaced with the parent path of the original file.
C:\Files\MyFiles\Sample.exe -> C:\Files
Output directory is ignored.

<file> Variable is replaced with the original file name with extension.
C:\MyFiles\Sample.exe -> Sample.exe
<dir>

Variable is replaced with the relative directory to the source file including the last backslash.
If the source file is
C:\MyFiles\*.html
and if the file to be processed is
C:\MyFiles\SubFiles\Sample.html
variable is replaced with
SubFiles\
If the file locates in the same directory as the source directory this parameter is ignored.

<body> Variable is replaced with the original file name without extension.
C:\MyFiles\Sample.exe -> Sample
<name>

Variable is replaced with the fixed name of the file or original file extension without period (if the file does not have a fixed name).
C:\MyFiles\Sample.exe -> MyName
Fixed name is a name determined by the original platform and it can not be fixed (e.g. .NET specifies assembly name in the project file and that name must be used in order to enable satellite assembly file).

<ext> Variable is replaced with the original file extension without period.
C:\MyFiles\Sample.exe -> exe

If pattern does not contains <dir> parameter Sisulizer automatically adds it into the beginning of pattern before processing it.

Language parameters are:

Parameter Description
<sl> Sisulizer's locale code is used.
For example "en" is for English, "en-US" is fo English (United States), "zh" is for Simplified Chinese, and "zh.tra" is for Traditional Chinese. The default Chinese script is the Simplified Chinese. This is why the language code of Traditional Chinese has a script part "zh.tra".
<iso> ISO locale code is used. It is combination of language and country. The syntax is
la[_co[_variant]]
where
la ISO-639 language code
co ISO-3166 country code
variant ISO variant code
For example "en" is for English, "en_US" is fo English (United States), and "zh_TW" is for Traditional Chinese. ISO language code does not have any way to code a country neutral Traditional Chinese. That is why Chinese (Taiwan) is used.
<ish> As above but separator is hyphen (-) instead of underline (_). The syntax is
la[-co[-variant]]
where
la ISO-639 language code
co ISO-3166 country code
variant ISO variant code
For example "en" is for English, "en-US" is fo English (United States), and "zh-TW" is for Traditional Chinese. ISO language code does not have any way to code a country neutral Traditional Chinese. That is why Chinese (Taiwan) is used.
<net>

NET culture code is used. It is combination of language and country. The syntax in .NET 4.0 and later is:
la[-script][-co]

or in .NET 2 and 3.x:

la[-co][-script]
where

la .NET language code.
script .NET script code. .NET 4 uses the standard script codes such as Hans, Hant, Cyrl, Latn, etc. .NET 2-3 uses legacy Chinese codes such as CHS and CHT.
co .NET country code
For example "en" is for English, "en-US" is fo English (United States), and "zh-Hant" is for Traditional Chinese. In .NET 2 and 3.x "zh-CHT" is for Traditional Chinese.
<tag>

IETF language tag code is used. It is combination of language, script and country. The syntax is:
la[-script][-co]
where

la ISO-639 language code
script ISO 15924 script code
co ISO-3166 country code
For example "en" is for English, "en-US" is fo English (United States), and "zh-Hant" is for Traditional Chinese.
<win> Windows locale code is used. It contains two or three upper case characters.
For example "EN" is for English, "ENU" is for English (United Stated), and "CHT" is for Traditional Chinese.
<mfc> MFC locale code is used. It contains three upper case characters.
For example "ENE" is for English, "ENG" is for English (United Kingdom), and "CHT" is for Traditional Chinese.
<nls> Windows locale id is used. It is a integer number containing the primary and sub language ids.
<hex> As above but four digit hex value is used instead decimal value.